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About SHARE's Founder & Chairman
Guerra Freitas, the Founder and Chairman of SHAREcircle, is one of the relatively few Angolans of limited means to successfully acquire a university education overseas. Guerra, through the efforts of Evanston, Illinois resident Dr. Patricia Deer and other friends, was sponsored to come to the U.S. for an education. He attended East-West University in Chicago and, as valedictorian of his class, received his Bachelors of Business Administration. Then, he went on to Northwestern University, where he received two Master degrees in Public Policy and Administration and in the Science of Communication, respectively. Freitas is an alumnus of the Harvard Business School Governing for Nonprofit Excellence Program. Freitas holds a Master of Liberal Arts in Management degree from Harvard University and he hopes to begin working on his Ph.D. studies in an education-related field, soon.

Guerra, who survived the war, including seven land mine incidents, is focused on paying forward the support he received from others. Through SHAREcircle, his home province of Bié, the provinces of Huambo, Kuando Kubango, Huila, Kwanza Norte and Luanda have received shipments of books, computers, medical supplies, solar ovens, vegetable and cereal seeds, agricultural implements, bicycles and wheelchairs to help them rebuild their lives. Now, he takes on a new program to bring a world-class university to his hometown, Kuito, the capital city of Bié Province.

Guerra's story of surviving the Siege of Kuito, of losing dozens of friends and family members (including his wife Teresa and son Abel to a single bullet) is both tragic and transformational. Guerra turned the pain and hopelessness of his situation into a way to create something new and inspirational.

With little funding and simply by telling his story and his dreams to others, Guerra has gone from being a high school teacher in Angola to testifying before the U.S. Congress on land mines and their impact on society in Angola, participating in International Conflict Resolution workshops, meeting senators, congressmen, governors, and ambassadors from around the world. Out of his experiences he has created an organization that has already changed the lives of thousands.

This new university SHARE and the community in Bié are working to establish in central Angola will give thousands of people, like Guerra, highly motivated, intelligent, and dedicated survivors the means to create a better life for themselves, their community, and the world.

Guerra Freitas serves as the Chairman of SHAREcircle, the Angola University Board of Trustees and the Angola University Foundation.

 

 

Guerra Freitas, Executive Director and Founder of SHAREcircle, is one of the relatively few Angolans of limited means to successfully acquire a university education overseas. Guerra, through the efforts of Evanston, Illinois resident Dr. Patricia Deer and other friends, was sponsored to come to the U.S. for an education. He attended East-West University in Chicago and, as valedictorian of his class, received his Bachelors of Business Administration. He then went on to Northwestern University where he received his Masters in Public Policy and Administration and is now pursuing another Masters degree in the Executive Master's of Business Administration at the Kellogg School of Management, at Northwestern University. Guerra, who survived the war, including seven land mine incidents, is focused on paying forward the support he received from others. Through SHAREcircle, his home province of Bié neighboring provinces of Huambo and Kuando Kubango, have received shipments of books, computers, medical supplies, solar ovens, vegetable and cereal seeds, agricultural implements and bicycles to help them rebuild their lives. Now he takes on a new program to bring a world-class university to his hometown, Kuito, the capital city of Bié Province. Guerra's story of surviving the Siege of Kuito, of losing dozens of friends and family members (including his wife Teresa and son Abel to a single bullet) is both tragic and transformational. Guerra turned the pain and hopelessness of his situation into a way to create something new and inspirational. With little funding and simply by telling his story and his dreams to others, Guerra has gone from being a high school teacher in Angola to testifying before the U.S. Congress on land mines and their impact on society in Angola, participating in International Conflict Resolution workshops, meeting senators, congressmen, governors, and ambassadors from around the world. Out of his experiences he has created an organization that has already changed the lives of thousands. This new university SHARE is working to establish in central Angola will give thousands of people like Guerra's highly motivated, intelligent, and dedicated survivors' he means to create a better life for themselves, their community, and the world.